Multiple sclerosis survivor named chief student marshal for spring commencement

After being diagnosed with a sometimes debilitating illness, Chacity Simmons felt even more determined to continue her education and reach her goals. Because of her tenacity and hard work, Simmons has earned the title of chief student marshal for the 2019 Spring Commencement for Southern University Baton Rouge set for Friday, May 10 at 10 a.m. at the F.G. Clark Activity Center.

 

"This is an unbelievable honor," said Simmons, who is graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. "As I go through life, I strive to do my best. I remain extremely humble and most grateful for Southern University’s recognition of one of my most important achievements. I extend my sincere gratitude for this honor.”

 

Though she has consistently performed well academically, life has placed obstacles in her way that attempted to discourage her from continuing her education. In 2016, a semester before attending Southern, Simmons was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). As a result, she became temporarily disabled, unable to walk unless assisted by a cane.

 

"After a month of treatment, I fully regained my physical strength and was able to care for myself," Simmons said. "Throughout the struggle with my health, I felt that I should make the best out of my life and continue my education at Southern University. Despite my medical diagnosis, I chose to persevere no matter the circumstance."

 

It has not been easy to manage life with yet another hurdle. Simmons, who is a single mother and a paralegal at the East Baton Rouge District Attorney's Office, knew that she could not give up. Being a role model for her family and friends, including her son, was very important.

 

"My son is a constant reminder of how I should fight through the pain and continue my education," Simmons said. "My son helps keep me on my toes. He’ll remind me to take my medication whenever he notices that I’m swamped with homework. Some days are better than others, but overall I’ve adjusted to my life well."

 

Because of her challenging lifestyle, she chose the online criminal justice program because of the convenience of the self-paced learning environment. She mentioned that it was easy and accessible to browse course materials and respond to discussion posts through the app on her phone.

 

As Simmons prepares to turn the tassel, she prepares for the next chapter in her life. Her future plans include attending law school at the Southern University Law Center and becoming an attorney.

 

"In my current position, I have the ability to observe and assist attorneys and it definitely encourages me to pursue a career in law," said Simmons, who is prepping to take the LSAT. "It’s quite an honor to learn from some the Southern University’s Law School alumni."

 

Before she departs the Bluff, she wants to pass along one piece of advice to students who are balancing a challenging diagnosis and wanting to pursue a college experience: Do not be discouraged.

 

"Throughout life, we may experience situations that are unwanted or unexpected, but with hard work and determination, you shall overcome," she said. "Remain focused on your goal no matter the circumstance. Adjusting to a new diagnosis may be difficult, but the ultimate reward for endurance is satisfying."

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