Department of Social Work

Undergraduate Program

Message from the Program Leader

Social Work is an exciting profession! The focus is on promoting the well-being of people – individuals, family, communities and institutions. Visit us in Higgins Hall on the Third floor and feel free to chat with instructors, visit the classroom, mingle with the students, experience the learning center, student learning spaces, the simulation labs and all that the program offers. Also feel free to contact us by email and visit Facebook. Allow me to introduce the profession to you by telling you who are professional social workers, where a social work career can take you and what social workers do.

Who are Professional Social Workers? this program prepares baccalaureate level professional social workers.  Professional social workers are persons obtaining a bachelor, master or doctoral degree from a Council on Social Work Education accredited social work program.  Professional social workers are educated, licensed, trained and experienced in many fields of practice.  Some of the fields of practice are: aging/elderly/gerontology; addictive behaviors (alcohol, drugs, food, gambling) child welfare, adoption, foster care education/schools; forensic/corrections/criminal justice; family–centered services; health care/public health/ medical/hospice; homeless; mental health; disabilities; military, international social work; immigrant and indigenous populations; income maintenance and more.

Where are Social Workers employed? Social Workers are employed in federal and state government, public social service agencies, private agencies, schools, group homes, residential treatment centers, hospitals, primary care physicians’ office, juvenile and adult correctional facilities, courts, district attorney &  public defender’s office, higher education, student health/counseling centers, veteran’s clinics, veterinary clinics, military,  senior communities, private and non-profit organizations, training programs, corporate and chemical industry, community action/activist organization,   . . .

SOCIAL WORKERS MAKE CHANGE POSSIBLE! We promote empowerment; we engage in counseling, case management, assessment, prevention, Intervention, investigation, advocacy, community planning, policy development, program planning, teaching and training, connect people to resources, job coach, rehabilitation, restoration and so much more. . .

Continue to read about the faculty, the program and the curriculum if the following pages.

Erma Borskey, Department Chair

Mission Statement

The mission of the social work professional degree program is to prepare competent, ethical, baccalaureate, generalist social workers to provide services that enhance the well-being of all client groups, with a focus on serving the poor, other at-risk populations, and African Americans.

This professional program prepares students for entry-level generalist social work practice and for graduate study in schools of social work and related disciplines. The Program’s goals are to produce ethical, effective and committed baccalaureate, generalist social workers who:   

  1. Use a person-in-environment approach and a variety of prevention and intervention methods to promote human and social well-being in their work in diverse settings with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities.
  2. Have a strong identification with the social work profession, use a strengths perspective, adopt basic social work values, and apply ethical principles and critical thinking in research-informed practice.
  3. Promote human rights and social and economic justice by empowering clients through social work practice with the disenfranchised and others from diverse ethnic, socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.

Programs and Degrees Offered

DEGREES OFFERED: Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work

The Department of Social Work offers a Bachelor of Science Degree in Social Work. This professional program prepares students for entry-level generalist social work practice. Students are also prepared for graduate study in schools of social work and related disciplines. Applicants are admitted to the program using the criteria outlined below.

PROGRAM ACCREDITATION

This is a professional degree program is accredited at the baccalaureate level by the Council on Social Work Education, 1725 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, Virginia 22314-3457, (703) 683-8080, accred@cswe.org or cswe.org.

Curriculum

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES: Department of Social Work Competencies

The program adopts the Council on Social Work Education – Social Work Competencies.  The graduate will demonstrate the competencies listed below.

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Competency 7:  Assess individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Competency 8:  Intervene with individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

 

PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIP

Students complete a minimum of 400 hours internship in a professional social work setting.  The internship is call Field Education and is identified as “the signature pedagogy in social work.   The intent of field education is to integrate the theoretical and conceptual contribution of the classroom with the practical world of the practice setting”. CSWE Educational Policy 2.2

STUDENT ORGAZNIATIONS

The Social Work Action Club is a major vehicle for student involvement in internal and external program affairs.  Membership in National Social Work Honor societies is available to students who show academic excellence. Students are eligible for membership in the National Association of Social Workers, the National Association of Black Social Workers and other professional social work associations.

ADMISSION INTO PROGRAM/PROFESSIONAL STATUS

Students are admitted to the program using the criteria below. Students are admitted without discrimination in regard to age, class, color, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or any other non-merit factors.

Application to the Department of Social Work may be made during the sophomore year. Admission requirements:

  • Transfer to the College 
  • A minimum grade of “C” in English 110 and 111
  • Passed the University Writing Proficiency Examination
  • Completed the following courses: Math 130, 131 or higher; History (6 hours), Biology 104, 105 and 106 or 107, Health 110, Psychology 210, Sociology 210 and Political Science 200
  • A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above
  • Earned a minimum grade of “C” in SOCW and SOCW 200 and SOCW 298
  • Submission of application and approval for admission

Courses Offered and Descriptions

  • 200.  SOCIAL WORK AS A PROFESSION (Credit, 3 hours). This course is an in-depth study of social work as a profession within the field of social welfare. It gives a historical perspective of social welfare and social work. A survey approach is used to examine the present-day structure and functions of the major fields of social work practice, as well as social work knowledge, values and skills.  
  • 204.  LOBBYING (Credit, 1 hour). Designed to provide introductory knowledge and beginning skills in social-political lobbying. This course would be of interest to students who wish to gain better knowledge of how the political process is carried out, and how they might influence this process.  Current and popular political issues will be addressed with a focus on local, state, and national legislative lobbying efforts. Students will have an opportunity to observe lobbying in process as well as consult with professional lobbyists.
  • 205.  HIV/AIDS SEMINAR (Credit, 1 hour). An overview of HIV/AIDS. The focus will be upon the medical, epidemiological, psycho-social trends, risk-reduction factors, and resources related to HIV/ AIDS.
  • 209.SOCIAL HEALTH ISSUES (Credit 1 hour). Course introduces students to some of the major problems and issues involved in addressing health care needs in the United States. Focus will be given to analysis and discussion of the nation’s health status and how effectively the health system prevents and addresses emerging health problems. Growing ethical issues and dilemmas affecting medical/ health care practice will also be covered.
  • 270.  INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY (Credit, 3 hours). Designed to enable students to understand the historical and philosophical development of social policies. Policy development will be studied within a social systems context. Analysis will be made of various social, political, and economic factors which influence policies; and of policies responsiveness to empowering groups of various racial, ethnic, class, gender, age, and other relevant distinctions. POLS 200 must be completed or taken concurrently with this course. Prerequisites: HIST (6 hours); POLS 200, SOCW 200. Pre/co-requisites not required for non-social work majors.
  • 280.  MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES (Credit, 3 hours). Examines mental health from historical and theoretical perspectives. It examines contemporary issues affecting mental health, consultation and education, alternatives to traditional mental health services and the prevention of mental disorders. This course will also examine problems, policy, and the evaluation of services.
  • 298.  INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE (Credit, 3 hours). Introduction to basic knowledge, values, and skills necessary for generalist social workers. Students learn the systems approach and acquire the initial communication skills needed for generalist social work practice. Students gain knowledge of their own values and personal capabilities, to begin developing their own effective helping skills. The course uses a laboratory experiential learning format. Open to social work majors only. Pre/co-requisite: SOCW 200.
  • 300.  ADDICTIVE BEHAVIORS (Credit, 3 hours). Course designed to examine the psycho- social aspects of addictive behaviors with specific emphasis on substance-related disorders, eating disorders, and gambling. The course will explore professional literature and social service resources as well as examine the effects of these problems among diverse groups.
  • 301. LAW AND SOCIAL WORK (Credit, 3 hours). The course provides an overview of the legal system in relation to helping professionals. It introduces selected laws and legal authority related to specific human service delivery systems. Special emphasis will be placed on ethics.
  • 310.  INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH (Credit, 3 hours). Introduces the student to the process of scientific inquiry. Particular emphasis will be made on issues regarding systematic methods and procedures in carrying out objective and scientific investigation in the social sciences. Prerequisite:  SOCW 200; Pre/co-requisite: SOCW 298.
  • 340.  VIOLENCE IN FAMILIES (Credit, 3 hours). Course is designed to increase student awareness of family violence. Focus is on the major forms of abuse: child, intimate partner, and elderly abuse. The course will address family violence at individual, family, group, community, and societal levels.
  • 370.  SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY ANALYSIS AND FORMULATION (Credit, 3 hours). De- signed to enable students to analyze current and proposed social policies and formulate policies within a social systems context. Analysis will be made of various social, political, and economic factors which influence policies; and of the policies’ potential for problem prevention and empowering diverse at-risk groups. Focus is given to racial, ethnic, class, gender, age, and other relevant distinctions. Prerequisites: SOCW 270 and its pre- requisites.
  • 375.  INTRODUCTION TO GERONTOLOGY (Credit, 3 hours). An overview of the study of aging from an interdisciplinary perspective with emphasis upon understanding various elderly sub- groups, i.e., minorities, for more effective social service delivery.
  • 380.  HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I (Credit, 3 hours). Course uses macro theories to examine theoretical perspectives on social, political, and economic dimensions of American society. Particular emphasis is given to ethnic and cultural diversity and social stratification.  Community, organizational, small group and family systems are studied as social contexts of human behavior. Prerequisites: BIOL 104 and BIOL 105, BIOL 106 or BIOL 107, HLTH 110, SOCL 210 and PSYC 210. To be taken prior to or concurrently with SOCW 393.
  • 381.  HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II (Credit, 3 hours). Course uses theoretical perspectives and research findings to examine the individual and families in social environmental context. It studies human growth and development across the life cycle. Prerequisites: SOCW 380 and its prerequisites. To be taken prior to or concurrently with SOCW 395.
  • 393.  GENERALIST SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I (Credit, 3 hours). Course based on a generalist problem-centered framework. It covers the engagement, data collection, assessment, and contract negotiation phases of problem solving. The course integrates theory, values, skills, and development of professional practice styles. Prerequisites: SOCW 200, and 298. Open to social work majors only.
  • 394.  GENERALIST PRACTICE LAB I (Credit 2 hours). The simulated experiential component of SOCW 393. It provides an experiential set- ting allowing students to integrate theory through case simulations, role playing, and videotaping as a means of skills development. SOCW 393 must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SOCW 200, and 298. Open to social work majors only.
  • 395.  GENERALIST SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II (Credit, 3 hours). Course continues the problem solving process through integrating intervention methods, termination, and evaluation of practice. Assists students in further developing their professional practice through identifying, selecting, and using various interventions and models directed toward micro, mezzo, and macro levels of social work practice. Provides basic knowledge on evaluating one’s own practice. SOCW 396 must be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: SOCW 200, 298, 393, and 394. Open to social work majors only.
  • 396.  INTRODUCTION TO FIELD INSTRUCTION (Credit, 2 hours). The course focuses on the students’ transition into the role of social worker, their orientation to the agency setting, their perceptions and feelings, and strengthening integration of theory with practice. This agency- focused experiential component prepares students for field instruction. Must be taken concurrently with SOCW 395. Prerequisites: SOCW 200, 298, 393, and 394. Open to social work majors only.
  • 410.  SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH (Credit, 3 hours). Designed to prepare students for becoming effective professional practitioners through incorporating a scientific and analytic approach to knowledge-building and practice. The course will present basic knowledge and skills for conducting practice research utilizing qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Students will be provided skills in the application of research-based knowledge and practice strategies, evaluating their own practice and reporting their research and evaluating findings. Prerequisites: Completed all required social work courses (200, 298, 310, 380, 381, 393, 394, 395, 396); and COMPS 105 or 290; and PSYC 274, MATH 274 or SOCL 350. Students must be concurrently enrolled in SOCW 490 and 491 or 492 and 493 or 494 and 495. Open to social work majors only.
  • 451.  INDEPENDENT STUDY (Credit, 3 hours each). The course allows students to select a social welfare topic to study on a concentrated, relatively autonomous basis. Students use a combination of several approaches including an internship, professional development, library research, survey research, and the application of presentation of study results. Prerequisite: Advanced junior or senior classification or by permission of the faculty person who has responsibility for directing the course.
  • 453.  GROUP DYNAMICS (Credit, 3 hours). Designed to help students learn how to conduct groups. Classroom becomes a laboratory for students to practice and develop group skills, including leadership. Types of groups, leading groups, communication groups, problem-solving and decision-making groups, self-help, educational sensitivity, therapeutic groups, termination, and evaluation will be covered.  
  • 460.  CASE MANAGEMENT (Credit, 3 hours). Examination of issues related to case management from a historical overview and explicit critical analysis of case management. Different case management models developed by social workers, case management practice in mental health, health care and long-term care, aging, physical or developmental disabilities, and in child welfare research/ program evaluation, and an advocacy/empowerment model of case management practice will be the focus.
  • 470.  ETHNIC FAMILIES (Credit, 3 hours). Course has both theoretical and applied components. Based upon sociological and historical approaches to understanding ethnic families in America. Various theories and models explaining family life are studied. The applied approach entails human service interventions that are particularly relevant to providing services to ethnic families. Useful to students majoring in several disciplines, other than social work, especially family life, sociology, psychology, education and recreation.
  • 471,472,473. SPECIAL TOPICS (Credit 1-3 hours). In-depth study of selected topics in social work. The course may repeat as topics vary.
  • 480.  SERVICES TO FAMILIES AND CHILDREN (Credit, 3 hours). A study of programs, services, and interdisciplinary intervention strategies pertaining to meeting the needs of families and children. Major emphasis will be on the historical implications, an overview and the scope of child welfare services, contemporary issues and trends, and services in a multicultural society. This course is recommended for students majoring in recreation, child development, education, political science, family life, and psychology.
  • 490.  FIELD INSTRUCTION I (Credit, 4 hours). This is the field practicum or internship. It provides first semester senior students with a supervised field placement involving entry-level generalist social practice experience in a social/human service delivery setting. Prerequisites:  Students enrolled in Fall-Spring Field Instruction, must complete:  SOCW 200, 270, 298, 310, 370, 380, 381, 393, 394, 395, 396.  Open to social work majors only.
  • 491.  FIELD INSTRUCTION SEMINAR I (Credit, 1 hour). The course allows students completing the field practicum to survey, observe, assess and discuss their professional growth and development. It supports the integration of social work knowledge, values and skills in the practicum setting.  This course is taken concurrently with SOCW 490.  Open to social work majors only. 
  • 492.  FIELD INSTRUCTION II (Credit, 4 hours). This is the continuation of Field Instruction I.  The course is taken concurrently with SOCW 493. Prerequisites SOCW 490, 491, and their prerequisites.  Open to social work majors only.
  • 493. FIELD INSTRUCTION SEMINAR II (Credit, 1 hour). This is a continuation of Field Instruction Seminar I. This course is taken concurrently with SOCW 492.  Prerequisites:  SOCW 490, 491 and the prerequisites.  Open to social work majors only. 
  • 494.  FIELD INSTRUCTION III (Credit, 8 hours). This is the field practicum or internship.  It provides senior students with a supervised field placement involving entry-level generalist social work practice experience in a social/human service delivery setting. Prerequisites:  Students must complete all general education course requirements and social work course requirements except, SOCW 410, 490, 491, 492, 491 and a 3 credit hour elective.  Open to social work majors only.
  • 495. FIELD INSTRUCTION Seminar III (Credit, 2 hours).  The course allows students completing the field practicum to survey, observe, assess and discuss their professional growth and development.  It supports the integration of social work knowledge, values and skills in the practicum setting.  This course is taken concurrently with SOCW 495.  Open to social work majors only

Faculty and Staff

FACULTY

Program Chair and Director of Field Education: 

Erma Borskey, MSW, LCSW, JD

Professor: 

Roslyn Richardson, MSW, LMSW, PH.D.

Assistant Professor

Tangela Colson, MSW, LCSW-BACS

 Instructor

Patsy Johnson, MSW, LCSW-BACS, Title IV-E Child Welfare Project Coordinator

 Adjunct Instructors:  

Raegan Carter, MSW, LMSW

Shalindra Farris, MSW, RSW

Donna Gaignard, MSW, LMSW

Xavier Henson, MSW, LMSW

Shamyra Howard, MSW, LCSW

Lanique Roussell-Sheppard, MSW, LMSW, MPD, SSBB

Monica Smith, MSW, LCSW, SSW-C

Darlene Vessel, MSW, LMSW

Melanie Washington, MSW, LCSW-BACS

 

STAFF

Patricia Smith PhD (ABD)

 

Erma Borskey. Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW), Louisiana State University; Juris Doctorate (JD), Southern University Law Center; Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW).

Tangela Colson. Bachelor of Criminal Justice (BS), Masters of Social Work (MSW), Louisiana State University. Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) and Board Approved Supervisor (BAC).

Roslyn Richardson. Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW), University of Alabama; Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Case Western Reserve, Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences; Licensed Masters Social Worker (LMSW).

Raegan Carter (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW) and Master of Public Health (MPH), Tulane University; Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW).

Lynn Farris (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BS), University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Masters of Social Work (MSW), Southern University at New Orleans. Registered Social Worker (RSW).

Donna Gaignard (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Social Work, Southern University. Masters of Social Work, University of Texas. Licensed Masters Social Worker (LMSW).

Shamyra Howard (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW), Southern University at New Orleans; Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW).

Xavier Henson (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Psychology (BS), Xavier University; Master of Social Work (MSW), Grambling State University; Doctor of Philosophy (ABD) in Social Work, Jackson State University; Licensed Masters Social Worker (LMSW).

Patsy Johnson (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW), Atlanta University; Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) and Board Approved BAC).

 Lanique Roussell-Sheppard (Adjunct).). Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW) and Master of Public Health (MPH), Tulane University; Doctor of Philosophy (PH.D.-ABD) in Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Southern University; Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW).

Monica R. Smith (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW) Tulane University; Licensed Masters Social Worker (LMSW).

Darlene Vessel (Adjunct). Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BS), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW), Louisiana State University; Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW); Certificate in Child and Youth Services.

Melanie Washington (Adjunct). Bachelor of Arts in Theater Arts (BA), Southern University; Masters of Social Work (MSW), Louisiana State University. Education Doctorate-Candidate, Education Leadership, University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW).

Contact Information

CONTACT INFORMATION: Department of Social Work

Department of Social Work

Southern University and A&M College

Rodney G. Higgins Hall

Suite 306

Southern Branch Post Office

Baton Rouge, LA 70813-2042

Phone: (225) 771-5450

Fax: (225) 771-4234

socialwork@subr.edu 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/subrsocw/

 

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT: Department of Social Work

Patricia Smith PhD (ABD)

Program Coordinator

patricia_smith@subr.edu

(225) 771-4695

 

Carrie Bowie-Bob

Administrative Support, Grants

carrie_bowie@subr.edu

(225) 771-4356

 

 

 

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