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Frequently Asked Questions

How Do I Make An Appointment?
How Long Do I Have To Wait To Get An Appointment?
How Do I Know If I Need Counseling?
Can My Parents, Teachers, Administrators, and Friends get Information About Whether I'm In Counseling, as well as the Reason I'm There?
How Many Sessions Will It Take To Solve My Problem?
Do I Have A Choice Of Which Counselor I Meet With?
Can The Staff Members at the UCC Prescribe Medications For Depression, Anxiety, etc.?


How Do I Make An Appointment?
The UCC is located near Jones and Boley dormitories and next to the infirmary/health center. The hours of operations are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Appointments to see a counselor may be made by telephone (771.2480) or in person for an intake (new client), regular returning or emergency/urgent session. Typically, the student's first contact with the UCC will be an intake interview (approximately 50-60 minutes) with a counselor. The student will either be assigned to the intake counselor, or an appropriate referral will be made within the Center, or to an outside agency. In case of after hour emergencies (5 p.m. M-F; holidays and weekends), students should contact the "Phone" a 24-hour crisis line at 225.924.3900.

How Long Do I Have To Wait To Get An Appointment?
If you are experiencing a mental health emergency, the first available counselor will see you. Otherwise, you would make an appointment for an "intake" session and you will most likely be seen within a day or two.

How Do I Know If I Need Counseling?
Contrary to belief that one must be "crazy" to seek counseling, students seek counseling for support on everyday issues and concerns such as stress/anxiety, roommate difficulties, relationship problems, as well as for significant challenges such as serious depression and the loss of loved ones. Everybody needs someone to talk to once in a while and, if you believe that meeting with someone who is not involved in your daily life may be beneficial to you, then counseling may be appropriate.

Some common reasons you may seek counseling are:

* Difficulty adjusting to life at Southern University
* Difficulty concentrating (e.g., when trying to study) and making decisions, racing thoughts
* Feeling tired, fatigued, like everything takes a lot of effort
* Feeling stressed out or anxious
* Wishing you were dead, having suicidal thoughts
* Use of alcohol or drugs is causing personal and/or academic problems for you
* Having experienced sexual assault or harassment
* Relationship breakup that has really disrupted your life
* Difficulty coping with the death of someone significant

Can My Parents, Teachers, Administrators, and Friends get Information About Whether I'm In Counseling, as well as the Reason I'm There?
No one can receive information about your counseling unless you give your counselor written permission for such disclosure, or if your counselor believes you are at significant risk to hurt yourself or another person and/or when required by law.

How Many Sessions Will It Take To Solve My Problem?
The number of sessions will depend on the nature of the difficulty you are seeking help for, and what it is you want to accomplish through counseling. Most students are in counseling for a short time, some a longer period. However, the average numbers of sessions students have utilized at the UCC have been seven (7). When longer-term work is needed and the UCC staff can not accommodate, a student can be referred to a mental health professional off-campus.

Do I Have A Choice Of Which Counselor I Meet With?
If you have a preference for a particular counselor, please inform the secretary as soon as possible and we will attempt to meet your request, whenever possible. If you desire to switch counselors after you have already begun counseling, please complete the Request for Tranfer To a Different UCC Therapist form and submit it to the secretary; every effort will be made to accommodate you. If you feel able to do so, it is helpful if you also discuss this with the counselor you began working with.

Can The Staff Members at the UCC Prescribe Medications For Me For Depression, Anxiety, etc.?
Neither counselors nor the psychologist (Ph.D.) are allowed to prescribe medications but the UCC contractual psychiatrist (MD) does. Currently, the psychiatrist both writes prescriptions and/or offers free samples when possible to students participating in therapy at the UCC. The UCC policy for medication stipulates that a student must be engaged in active therapy with a counselor in the UCC in order to benefit from its medication program.