Course Descriptions

05. SEMINAR IN EDUCATION (Credit, 2 hours). This is a survey course designed to introduce freshman students to the field of teacher education as a career. Students become familiar with policies and procedures of the university as stipulated in the university catalog, the College’s conceptual framework, the governing bodies of the college, historical ramifications of education, educational philosophies and theories, professional organizations and their impact on teacher education. Students will participate in activities relative to entrance requirements for teacher education and portfolio development. The prospective teacher education candidates prepare for the PRAXIS I examination.t of body text.

 

211. PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION (Credit, 2 hours).This course helps prospective teachers learn how to teach or improve their teaching, as well as teaching students how to learn. It includes techniques in reporting and analyzing important research, presentation of practical teaching and learning procedures, selection and implementation of effective classroom instructional and management strategies, curriculum design, lesson planning, material selection and use, classroom management, and evaluation in the teaching- learning process are explored.

 

315. ART IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Credit, 3 hours). This course will expose teacher candidates to the selection, organization, guidance, and evaluation of art activities for students in elementary schools. The candidates experience using selected methods and materials: they will also be required to present finished projects.

 

323. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (Credit, 3 hours). This course includes field experiences. The goals of the course are to: 1) implement instructional strategies and materials that focus on students’ understanding and appreciation of diverse cultural groups in a pluralistic society, enable students to analyze, evaluate, and propose solutions to contemporary social problems; 2) correct misrepresentations of any cultural group according to diversity factors; 3) address issues of racism, bias and prejudice as these factors affect the experience of individuals and groups; 4) identify strategies that encourage students’ valuing their own heritage throughout the world; 5) develop awareness and sensitivity to individual differences within cultural groups; and 6) identify stereotypes related to diversity factors.

 

328. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT for TEACHERS (Credit, 3 hours). This course gives teacher candidates the information and skills to establish classroom management systems. The content addresses the planning decisions teachers make in arranging the physical space, establishing rules and procedures, planning and conducting instruction, maintaining appropriate behavior, preventive problem behavior, using good communication skills, and managing special groups.

 

329. MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS (Credit, 3 hours). This course emphasizes a conceptual approach to the teaching of mathematics, which is problem centered, content oriented, and learner supportive. It advocates discovery based mathematics instruction. Topics develop knowledge of, and use mathematical concepts, procedures, and reasoning processes specific to grades 1-6: problem solving, sets, functions and reasoning, whole numbers, number theory, integers and fractions, decimals, rational and irrational numbers, statistics, probability, geometry, algebra and measurement.

 

330. ELEMENTARY SOCIAL STUDIES METHODS (Credit, 3 hours). In accordance with the ACEI/NCSS standards for social studies, candidates will be provided opportunities to know, understand, and use the major concepts and modes of inquiry from the social studies they promote elementary students’ abilities to make informed decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse democratic society and interdependent world. Candidates engage in critical analyses of variety of objectives, instructional materials strategies, and assessment techniques for elementary social studies.

 

331.ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE ARTS METHODS (Credits, 3 hours). This course helps candidates gain competence in the use of English Language Arts. Opportunities will be provided to use concepts from reading, language and child development to teach students reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and thinking skills and to help candidates apply their developing skills to different situations, materials, and ideas. This course is aligned with ACEI /NCATE standards and with the conceptual framework of the College of Education.

 

335. ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS METHODS (Credit, 3 hours). This course 1) familiarizes teacher candidates with the guiding principles that have proven to be effective in facilitating the learning of mathematics on the part of all elementary students; 2) enables teacher candidates to develop the process skills that will result in the students acquisition of mathematical content knowledge; and 3) heightens the awareness on the part of teacher candidates that mathematics is a human activity to which all cultures have contributed. 

 

336. ELEMENTARY SCIENCE METHODS (Credit, 3 hours). This course 1) familiarizes teacher candidates with the principles and practices that have proven effective in facilitating the learning of science; 2) enables teacher candidates to develop the inquiry-based process skills; 3) enables teacher candidates to engage students in the acquisition and application of science content knowledge applicable aligned with ACEI standards; 4) enables teacher candidates to develop scientific attitudes and values; and 5) heightens the awareness that science is a human enterprise to which all cultures have contributed.

 

337. ELEMENTARY READING METHODS (Credit, 3 hours). This course enables elementary teacher candidates to examine objectives, principles, and practices in reading. Teacher candidates develop competence in providing reading experiences appropriate to the learning styles of diverse children. 280 

 

349. DIAGNOSIS AND CORRECTION OF READING DIFFICULTIES (Credit, 3 hours). This course examines the multiple facets of diagnosing and correcting reading problems among students. It gives candidates concrete methods of identifying and correcting reading difficulties. The importance of direct instruction, motivational learning activities, and abundant practice is stressed throughout this course. Candidates are required to construct their own diagnostic kits during this course.

 

402. EVALUATION PROCEDURES (Credit, 3 hours). This course enhances teacher candidates’ understanding of the relationship between evaluation procedures and the teaching-learning process. The candidate learns how to construct classroom tests that measure specific learning outcomes, interpret tests, how to administer tests properly, and use test results effectively. Constructing and using non-test evaluation instruments, and interpreting simple statistical data is required in the course.

 

416. PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES (Credit, 2 hours). This course develops objectives, methods, instructional and evaluation procedures, along with materials used in the teaching of music in the elementary school, including unit and lesson planning. Students have functional experiences with the soprano recorder, autoharp, guitar, and Or ff instruments. Students observe elementary vocal and instrumental music classes in the public schools. Prerequisite: Completion of core music courses.

 

417. PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (Credit, 2 hours). This course teaches the objectives, methods, materials, and instructional and evaluation procedures used in music and secondary schools. Special attention is given to teaching music courses in secondary schools, including chorus and general music, boys’ and girls’ glee clubs, orchestra, and special theory classes. Students learn evaluation procedures, tests, and measurements appropriate to secondary school music. Spring. Prerequisite: CRIN 416.

 

441. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (Credit, 9 hours). Professional laboratory experiences for students in early childhood education, consisting of observation and student teaching. One half of the semester is devoted to working with children at the kindergarten level and the other half is devoted to working with children in a regular classroom situation. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA, passing scores on the PRAXIS Series Examination.

 

443. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (Credit, 9 hours). Professional laboratory experiences for elementary education majors in a regular classroom situation involving students at their level of interest from first through sixth grade for a period of one semester. Prerequisite: Level III Admission Standards. 279

 

445. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN MIDDLE SCHOOLS (Credit, 9 hours). Observing and teaching in middle co-operating middle schools under the direction of the middle teachers and University supervisors. Prerequisite: Level III Admission Standards.

 

463. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION I (Credit, 3 hours). Professional laboratory experiences

for elementary education majors in a regular classroom situation involving students at their level of interest from first through fifth grade for a period of one semester.

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA AND Passing scores on the PRAXIS Core Examination (PRAXIS I) OR exemption with state approved ACT or SAT Scores AND a valid Resident Teacher Certificate.

 

 

 

464. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION II (Credit, 6 hours). Professional laboratory experiences

for elementary education majors in a regular classroom situation involving students at their level of interest from first through fifth grade for a period of one semester.

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA AND Successful completion of CRIN 463 AND Passing scores on the PRAXIS Content Examination AND Passing scores on the PRAXIS PLT Examination AND valid Resident Teacher Certificate.

 

465. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN MIDDLE SCHOOLS I (Credit, 3 hours). Professional laboratory experiences for middle grades education majors in a regular classroom situation involving students at their level of interest from fourth through eighth grade for a period of one semester.

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA AND Passing scores on the PRAXIS Core Examination (PRAXIS I) OR exemption with state approved ACT or

SAT Scores AND a valid Resident Teacher Certificate.

  

466. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN MIDDLE SCHOOLS II (Credit, 6 hours). Professional laboratory experiences for middle grades education majors in a regular classroom situation involving students at their level of interest from fourth through eighth grade for a period of one semester.

Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA AND Successful completion of CRIN 465 AND Passing scores on the PRAXIS Content Examination AND

Passing scores on the PRAXIS PLT Examination AND valid Resident Teacher Certificate.

 

477. OBSERVATION AND STUDENT TEACHING IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (Credit, 9 hours). Observing and teaching in cooperating high schools under the direction of high school subject matter teachers and University supervisors. Prerequisite: Level III Admission Standards.

 

495. TEACHING READING IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS (Credit, 3 hours). This course teaches candidates to integrate reading across content areas. The course integrates reading, writing, speaking, and listening strategies and activities. It emphasizes comprehension as a tool to expand the existing knowledge base of each individual learner. The major emphasis is on the practice of a balanced literacy approach stressing the importance and necessity of combining research-based skills and strategies with literary text and informational text based on research and theories of learning. The course helps candidates become lifelong learners, problem solvers, and critical thinkers. It adheres to standards of the International Reading Association (IRA) and the unit’s conceptual framework themes.

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